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#180: 5 Principles of an Optimized Life with Taylor Morgan

The whole premise around being the captain of your own life is realizing that you and only you are in 100% control of your thoughts and your actions. Nobody else can control you. And once you feel that, it’s empowering. I like being an entrepreneur because whether I succeed or whether I fail, it’s 100% my fault. Nobody else had any say in it. It is all on me. Even if your company fails, it’s 100% on you even if you have hundred-plus employees. If the employees aren’t performing, that’s your fault for not explaining or helping teach them correctly.

So it’s all your fault! Which sounds harsh.

Shana James:

Hello dear readers. I’m excited to be here today speaking with Taylor Morgan. Welcome, Taylor.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Shana, thank you so much.

 

Shana James:

Yeah. We will focus on lifestyle optimization, or another way to say that might be work-life balance and the idea of really being the captain of your own life. I love that metaphor because we sometimes talk about people sleepwalking through life or just drifting. Or successful people, they’ve got it together, they’ve got family, they’ve created a life for themselves, and at some point, that life can kind of go onto autopilot. Where you’re no longer necessarily captaining your life. You’re just going with the flow. And I find that that’s not really that satisfying for a lot of people. So I’m really curious to hear about what you talk about. What would you say lifestyle optimization actually is?

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. Wow! That’s a big question. It’s kind of everything, right? Everything about your lifestyle. But in my program, I walk you through it in the order that I believe is most important.

So first and foremost is the mindset. We talk about a growth mindset and setting your core values, your mission statement, all that stuff. That’s the base level.

 

Shana James:

That’s like the foundation of it all. Before you would even go do something or create something, you’ve got to get into the mindset piece.

 

Taylor Morgan:

You’ve got to know why you’re doing something, and whether what you’re doing is leading you to fulfillment or not. Because as you mentioned earlier, a lot of people are just kind of living on autopilot. And I think I got this from The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey. He talks about climbing the ladder of what you believe to be success, only to get to the top and you don’t like where you’re at. And that can be because you didn’t spend the time developing your mission statement, which is what I like to call your treasure map. After all, that leads you to your ultimate treasure, whatever you want in life. You get to decide that.

 

Shana James:

Right. You get to decide, rather than chase a treasure that someone else put on a map.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Exactly. It’s not the blanket success statement of, “Get good grades, go to a good college, get a good job, get the wife, and that’s it. You’re successful.” A lot of people, the majority of people, that doesn’t work. They have to define it for themselves. And then there are the core values, I like to call that your compass directions. Because if you follow those core values, living up to your own standards, the person you want to be, that should lead you to your ultimate goal, the treasure map. It should lead you to your treasure. That’s the base level. You’ve got to know where you’re going before you start off on the voyage.

 

Shana James:

You’ve got to set your course before you go to sea.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Exactly.

 

Shana James:

One of the things that I love that you talk about is accepting nothing shy of excellence. And I was thinking, from one perspective, that can put a lot of pressure on someone. “I have to be excellent at something.” But from another perspective, I could see, wow, it’s so easy to settle for something being mediocre or kind of okay, or realize we’re not going to get everything we want. There are those perspectives. How do you go about not having people settle for anything shy of excellence? What does that look like?

 

Taylor Morgan:

I’ve thought about this a lot because growing up, I was obsessed with perfection. Not that I was a perfectionist, but I was constantly striving to make things perfect. But now, kind of thinking about that, I know that nothing can ever be perfect, but we’re trying to get as close to it as possible. So I always had this phrase in my head, “I’m on the pursuit of perfection,” knowing full well that that’s never attainable. But you can get as close as you possibly can by continuously revising and revising.

 

Shana James:

And that was helpful for you, or that was a hindrance?

 

Taylor Morgan:

No, that was helpful for me. But I feel like excellence is a better word because perfectionism is like an infectious disease. I don’t think it’s a good thing at all. I think it holds people back from many things because they’re so focused on making it perfect. But if it’s never going to be perfect, they’re never going to release the thing. A common example is social media. Like, you have to wait until a post is perfect for sending it out to the world, but.

 

Shana James:

Then it’s never going to happen.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. If you’re running a business, you’re not going to get anything done. That’s why you put out the MVP, minimum viable product.

 

Shana James:

Exactly.

 

Taylor Morgan:

And then let your consumers tell you.

 

Shana James:

Tell you whether it’s actually going to sell or not and which parts to put more energy into and more creation.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Exactly. So the excellence side of it, I like to say it’s progress, not perfection. So get the thing out there. It’s not going to be perfect. Going to the gym is another example. You’re not going to be fit before you start going to the gym. You have to start somewhere first and then progress. So it’s not beating yourself up when things aren’t perfect and just knowing that it’s the process, right? You never really reach the destination of excellence. You’re never just, “I’m excellent.” It’s the journey, the process towards becoming excellent.

I also like to pay attention to detail and make the little things the big things. But again, not going overboard with it. Not like OCD level, where you can’t do anything else until this one little thing is perfect, but just noticing the tiny details.

 

Shana James:

What’s an example of making a little thing a big thing?

 

Taylor Morgan:

In relationships, there is a huge example. A husband and wife are constantly bickering back and forth about the dishes being dirty or whatever. That is a little thing. And usually, stereotypically, it’s the guy, and I include myself here, I do this, and I’m aware of it. I blow it off. That’s not a big deal to me, but clearly, it is a big deal because it’s causing this issue.

 

Shana James:

Right, if it’s causing friction, yeah.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Right. So understanding that and taking a step back and saying, “Okay, I perceive this as a little thing, but clearly, my partner does not perceive it as a little thing.”

And sometimes what you might find out, as I’m sure you’re well aware of, is that it’s not the little thing that was the issue a lot of times.

 

Shana James:

Oh, no, never.

 

Taylor Morgan:

There’s some underlying miscommunication somewhere.

 

Shana James:

Yeah. It’s so interesting, right? If there’s a romantic relationship or a business relationship or any kind of relationship, if there is something that seems like one person saying, “Oh, this isn’t a big deal. It’s little,” but then the other person actually sees it as a big deal, and so there’s grit there. There’s a grain of sand that’s rubbing someone the wrong way. So I like the idea of actually turning that situation into something where, “Hey, let’s be willing to look at this as though it were a big thing that really mattered. Without necessarily trying to find perfection, but really recognizing that there’s something here if it’s causing conflict. And how do we actually relate to this in a way that creates something great for both of us? As opposed to only one of us?”

When someone doesn’t accept anything shy of excellence, can you explain what that looks like? Without it being someone who’s just 100% rigid or being an asshole about it? How do they engage with that concept?

 

Taylor Morgan:

It can be a pretty difficult dichotomy to not get caught up in perfection and make sure everything is perfect, and instead, settling on excellence. I say as long as you’re constantly progressing, or trying to get better at whatever it is you’re doing, in whatever category, then that’s all you can possibly do!

 

Shana James:

That is excellence.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. Don’t worry so much about the specific outcome. Just worry about whether you are giving your 100% best effort in everything that you can? And if so, great!

 

Shana James:

Yeah. If you’re bringing your best effort or bringing excellence, that doesn’t mean things will turn out the way you thought they would.

 

Taylor Morgan:

No, of course not. There are going to be a lot of failures because that’s how you grow.

 

Shana James:

What’s been your experience around that? What are some of the failures that you’ve been through in that way?

 

Taylor Morgan:

Well, first, I like to say that I don’t really have any quote-unquote “failures” because I’ve been able to learn from those experiences. I believe that you only fail if you either give up or stop trying.

 

Shana James:

I love that.

 

Taylor Morgan:

But I will say my biggest failure is when I was in the Marine Corps and tried out for what’s called the sniper screener. It’s five days long of, basically, torture.

 

Shana James:

Wow.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Two, three hours of sleep a night, constantly moving. You don’t get to go home and shower. Little food, little water. Just a whole bunch of mental mind games.

 

Shana James:

Pushed to the edge.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yes. They are trying to weed out who can make it into the sniper platoon. So I made it all the way to the end. I completed it. I passed, but I was the only one of, I think, of the seven people who passed the course who did not make the team.

 

Shana James:

Wow!

 

Taylor Morgan:

And that hurt me.

 

Shana James:

I was going to say that sounds like it could have been devastating.

 

Taylor Morgan:

I was not happy with my position as a machine gunner simply because there were some leadership issues there. But that hurt because we started with, I don’t know, 50-some-odd people. I made it through this horrible experience all the way to the end and then come to find out that I was the only one who did not make the team that passed. And I later found out that it was because the other people who made it voted that I was not a team player.

 

Shana James:

Wow!

 

Taylor Morgan:

That I focused too much on myself and didn’t care so much for anybody else because I’ve always kind of been physically capable and mentally capable of accomplishing things.

 

Shana James:

Extreme circumstances.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. So even though it was very difficult, I could kind of handle that. But obviously, if it’s difficult for me, it’s difficult for everybody else. And so everybody else is struggling, and I guess they saw that I wasn’t doing or giving my best effort to help other people along and achieve the same thing. And in a military platoon, that is a huge part of it, is being able to work well together with other people. And now, looking back, they were right. I was just focused on me getting through it. I would say that was my biggest failure, but I’m glad I went through it.

 

Shana James:

It’s not a failure, right? It sounds like it illuminated something really powerful for you, even amid the pain. And your life has taken a huge turn now that you’re not in the military anymore. And you’re using everything that you learned over there to support people.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Oh yeah!

 

Shana James:

Yeah. Wow! Okay, so you were a machine gunner and tried out for the sniper… What was it called?

 

Taylor Morgan:

The sniper platoon. 

 

Shana James:

The sniper platoon. I mean, that’s an experience not a lot of people have. I don’t know if I could say “not a lot”, but relatively rare, right, for people who are civilians to actually identify with that? And the piece around teamwork and collaboration, it’s a really beautiful lesson, as painful as it was.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yes, absolutely.

 

Shana James:

I’m curious how that’s helped you now, especially in the work you’re doing and supporting other people?

 

Taylor Morgan:

Well, like I said, it made me realize that I am not the center of the universe, right? I don’t matter. In the whole grand scheme of things, I’m just one person, and that’s not how I was going about life. I was going through life like everything was focused on me, even though, at the time, I didn’t necessarily know this. Like, in the sniper screener, this kid passed out, and I had to carry him, physically carry him, on my back for the rest of the way. 

 

Shana James:

Yeah, that sounds like teamwork.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Teamwork, yeah, absolutely. So when they told me that that was the reason why I didn’t make it, because I wasn’t a team player, I got upset, because I was like, “Well, I did this, this, and this.” It’s like, okay, well, clearly they saw something else, so it doesn’t matter what I think. I clearly need to work on my teamwork. So that case, along with other experiences, has helped me in business. When I’m looking to hire employees, it’s not just about what I want, but how can I help them help me? So instead of asking, “What can you do for me?” instead, I’ll say, “How can I better support you in whatever it is you’re doing?”

 

Shana James:

Whatever goal or whatever we need to accomplish here? That’s powerful. I was just thinking, too, about what you said. Like, “I don’t matter.” I mean, on the one hand, that feels defeating, right? “Oh, I don’t really matter.” But on the other hand, it sounds like it’s freed you up to see a bigger picture, to include other people?

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. I mean, if you look at life, like the universe, me, Taylor Morgan, is simply a-, I don’t even know… A millionth of a fraction of a second in time! It’s nothing. But me living my life; obviously, I think I’m important. I feel like I’m doing good work. I’m trying to help people to change the world. So, yeah, I don’t know. I kind of see it from both ways. Like, any time something quote-unquote “catastrophic” happens in my life, it’s just realizing that it really doesn’t matter, in the big picture sense. That’s what helps me deal with “catastrophes.”

I think I heard this on a Tim Ferriss podcast. One of the questions he asked was, “If you could have one thing put up on a billboard for everybody to see, what would it say?” And his guest said, “Just relax.” Will this problem you have matter in five years? Most of the stuff we worry about really doesn’t matter, and it’s just unnecessary stress. So yeah, it definitely goes both ways there. It can seem depressing this idea of “I don’t matter.” But at the same time, it’s liberating.

 

Shana James:

I can feel the liberation of that. There are many things that I get caught up in, in the day-to-day. Sometimes I really do look ahead to five years or at the end of my life, and will this have mattered? Or even if it would matter, how do I want to handle it so that it’s not based in stress and anxiety? Because that usually doesn’t get me where I want to go anyway!

 

Taylor Morgan:

It’s more living in the moment. Traffic is a common example. People are so stressed out and angry at the traffic. It’s like, “Okay, well, can you do anything about it? No. So you can either sit there and be stressed and raise your cortisol levels and ruin your health, or you can practice some breathwork. You can listen to an educational podcast.” You have things in your control, that you can do, instead of just being stressed out about the past and worrying about the future. Just enjoy the present moment because that’s all you have.

 

Shana James:

One of your principles sounds like being obsessed with growth, you wrote on your website. And I can feel that every moment is an opportunity to practice and become more conscious or reduce the stress on your body. What are some of the things that you practice daily in that way?

 

Taylor Morgan:

Oh, man. Almost my whole entire day, definitely my whole entire morning is based on growth and just personal development. So I have a whole long morning ritual, starting from 4:30, leading all the way up until 7:30. That starts with some stretching, some yoga, just getting the blood flowing. I like to talk about the CAGES method, which I teach in my program. My client actually came up with the acronym, shout-out to him! But it stands for cold exposure, affirmations, growth, exercise, and sunlight. So these are the things that I feel are needed in a morning ritual.

Cold exposure for a whole host of reasons, specifically in the morning, is a mental challenge. The last thing you want to do in the morning is to take a cold shower, but that’s exactly why you should. Because if you start your day off with a challenge, everything else in your day will be easier. That traffic is suddenly not going to seem so bad, right? Then affirmations, things like reading your core values, your mission statement, your goals, and stuff like that. Growth is any type of learning. I like to read in the morning. I listen to educational podcasts in the morning. It could be practicing skills, anything like that because when you stop learning, you stop growing. And then exercise, but not necessarily breaking a sweat. But I do yoga in the morning, so some type of stretching, just something to get your blood flowing.

 

Shana James:

Something to get your body in line, your blood flowing.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Exactly, just to get moving. A great one is going outside for a morning walk because that way, you can combine the S, which is sunshine, with movement. And the sunshine is important because that wakes you up in the morning. It sets your circadian rhythm, which is your body’s internal clock, and wakes you up. It shuts off melatonin production and resets it for that night. So the more sun you get in the morning, the better you sleep at night, the happier you are because of the vitamin D and all that.

 

Shana James:

That’s great. I love it. I’ve actually been committing to those morning practices recently. Having a kid means it’s been challenging, but I’ve been doing my yoga and actually including breath work. But then, the cold exposure, I still struggle with that one. I’m still a little bit of a wimp in that way. What do you suggest for people who have kids and have to be at work at a certain hour? I mean, you get up at 4:30 in the morning, so I guess that’s one way that you counter that!

 

Taylor Morgan:

Well, I make sure that I get enough sleep. I disagree with the common thing, “Oh, just wake up earlier.” Well, if you’re sacrificing your sleep to do that, you may be doing more harm than good. I always say to my clients, “Something is always better than nothing. It doesn’t matter. Read one page. That’s better than not reading at all.” Because my clients are all busy entrepreneurs. They’ve got stuff going on. So that’s what I tell them in the beginning, until we get to the point where we can completely optimize their day. But once they’re first starting out, they feel like they can’t add anything else.

 

Shana James:

Right. Reading one page is way better than not reading at all, right?

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yes. Doing five push ups is better than just sitting on the couch. And most of the time, if you just commit to reading one page, taking a cold shower for five seconds, doing five pushups, most of the time, you will probably go do a little bit more. Something is better than nothing. Don’t commit to an hour a day if you feel like you don’t have 15 minutes.

 

Shana James:

Right. It’s so interesting, too, where time bends in a way. I wouldn’t necessarily say that I had time somehow. Then suddenly, the more I start doing things, the more I prioritize that over something else and make that time. Or go to bed earlier, wake up, and start to wake up earlier. So it is really interesting how once it becomes a priority, we make more time and space for it.

 

Taylor Morgan:

That is exactly it. I always tell my clients and everybody, “Whenever I hear the excuse you don’t have time, that’s all it is. It’s an excuse.”

 

Shana James:

It’s not a priority.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Everybody always makes time for their priorities. Always. If you can’t make the time, it’s not your priority.

 

Shana James:

Interesting.

 

Taylor Morgan:

I guarantee you if you have kids and you’re at work and in an important business meeting, and you get an emergency notification that your kid is injured, it doesn’t matter what is going on. You are going to save your kid because that is your priority, right? So it’s not that you don’t have time. That’s just an excuse that people give.

 

Shana James:

I love it. That used to sound really harsh to me, but I think I get it more than ever.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Because your language matters, right? You can say one thing and mean another thing. So it’s making these simple language switches from “I can’t do dot, dot, dot,” to “I won’t dot, dot, dot.” Most of the time, you can go do that thing, but you’re choosing not to. Same thing with like, “I have to go pick up my kids.” Well, no, you don’t. You get to go pick up your kids. You want to go pick up your kids. You don’t have to. What if you didn’t? They would stay at school longer, and I don’t know, you could call an Uber. You don’t have to do that.

 

Shana James:

Other things could happen. People could debate these things, “But I do have to, or I do have to work, or I do have to put food on the table.” And there is a different energy around it when you recognize it as a choice.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. The whole premise around being the captain of your own life is realizing that you and only you are in 100% control of your thoughts and your actions. Nobody else can control you. And once you feel that, it’s empowering. I like being an entrepreneur because whether I succeed or whether I fail, it’s 100% my fault. Nobody else had any say in it. It is all on me. Even if your company fails, it’s 100% on you even if you have hundred-plus employees. If the employees aren’t performing, that’s your fault for not explaining or helping teach them correctly.

So it’s all your fault! Which sounds harsh.

 

Shana James:

It sounds harsh, but at the same time, that’s the only place where you have power coming from to fuel you.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yes, exactly.

 

Shana James:

So what did you say? It wasn’t everything’s a choice, was it? No, there was some other way you said it that was awesome. Oh, that you’re the only one who has control! No one else can actually control you.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yes.

 

Shana James:

That’s brilliant.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. And a lot of that comes from Jocko Willink. He’s a Navy SEAL, author of Extreme Ownership. Because he was a Navy SEAL platoon commander. He was leading at the highest level, the highest stakes. Men died under his watch. And that is a horrible thing to have to admit that, “Hey, this is on me. That was my fault.” And that’s what the book talks about, just having extreme ownership and understanding that you are in control of your own life.

 

Shana James:

Wow! So powerful. Okay, I have another question. You talk about supporting men to be leaders and to be an inspiration to those around them. I would imagine that that is a big part of it, when you actually take that full responsibility. And you could say to your people, “How can I support you?” rather than, “Why are you doing it this way?” 

That’s incredibly inspiring. What else do you do to inspire other people?

 

Taylor Morgan:

The biggest thing is leading by example. And one of the coolest experiences that I’ve had from The Captain’s Lifestyle program is, some of my clients go through the program. They’re completely changing their lifestyle around, and they’re starting to work out. They’re starting to eat better. They’re getting more happiness, whatever that looks like for them. And then the people around them start to notice. And so I’ve had clients whose Mom is overweight, and they’ve been bickering at her, “Hey, Mom, you need to eat better, exercise, whatever, blah, blah, blah.” And Mom doesn’t want to hear any of that!

 

Shana James:

Mom doesn’t listen. Yeah.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Exactly. But now that Mom sees her son doing that for himself, her son is getting up every morning and going for a walk, coming back, making a healthy breakfast, and he’s feeling great! He looks amazing! He’s happy. The Mom’s like, “Oh, hey! What is this?”

 

Shana James:

“What’s happening?”

 

Taylor Morgan:

“What’s going on? I want some of that happiness. I want to be radiant like that.” So they get whoever is around them in on it. And that is amazing because not only do I get to coach the client, but indirectly, I’m helping everybody around them, and that feels really good!

 

Shana James:

Yeah. That’s awesome. Leading by example. People don’t really want to be told what to do, but when they see that example of radiance or health or power, we get really curious about how can I have some of that too?

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. In my relationship with my girlfriend, being a lifestyle coach and having growth as one of my core values, I am constantly trying to help her. She’s coming to me with something that happened in her day. And me, as the coach, I want to help. But she just wants her boyfriend to listen to her and validate her feelings and just have somebody to talk to. But for me, that’s not how I operate, so I’m constantly trying to figure things out. So I’ve had to learn this the hard way, that to be inspirational, sometimes you can’t tell somebody what to do. It’s more about asking better questions and then leading by example, showing them that way. And sometimes, I might be wrong. Like, I try to talk to my girlfriend and say, “I think you should do this.” But that’s how I think it would work for me, and for her, it could be completely different. 

 

Shana James:

Well, that’s incredible humility to actually be able to admit, right? “I have a way that I think this would go, and I think this would be best, and maybe not.”

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. I’ve really struggled with that. Because we’ve had so many arguments, based off of just miscommunication like this. And once you start to realize that, for me, I don’t know everything. I especially don’t know what’s going to help my girlfriend. And a lot of times, she’s telling me exactly what she wants, but in my head, my ego is going back to that idea of, “I know what is right. Listen to me.” And so I just need to relax and say, “Okay, maybe I am wrong. Maybe, most likely, she is right, and I should listen to her.”

 

Shana James:

Yeah, right. And that there’s something in what she is saying or what anyone could be saying that is right.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah.

 

Shana James:

And can we kind of honor that and work from there, versus my way?

 

Taylor Morgan:

The different perspectives. Communication and perspective is the cause of every single issue known to man because if I was in that person’s shoes and I grew up the same way they grew up, I probably would have done exactly what they did.

 

Shana James:

You’d probably do the same things, think the same thoughts.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Most people are just trying to do the best they can with what they know—most people.

There are some psychopaths, unfortunately, too! 

 

Shana James:

Yeah. There are a few! But I really love that sense of assuming the best about people, that there’s a reason that they’re doing what they’re doing. And if I can start to understand why they might be doing it, then there’s some collaboration possible. Then we can actually work together.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yeah. That was very hard for me, too, and I’m still working on it because there’s still that part inside me that wants them to fail or wants to get revenge for whatever happened. But then I think about it. For example, if someone is leaving a comment online that’s full of hate, then that someone has to be hurting so much and in such a bad place that they would want to put out negative energy onto somebody else. So then I start to feel compassionate and empathetic towards them. “Wow, they must be really going through something.” And that just completely changes my perspective, and it makes living a lot more enjoyable because you’re not all angry and pissed off all the time.

 

Shana James:

Right. Right. I mean, one benefit is for them, but the other benefit is that you don’t have to walk around with all of that intensity and anger. 

 

Taylor Morgan:

And everybody can succeed. This is the last thing I’ll say. Everybody can succeed. You don’t have to wish anybody harm. Everybody has the opportunity to succeed.

 

Shana James:

There’s enough success to go around.

 

Taylor Morgan:

There’s enough. Yes.

 

Shana James:

All right! What else do you want to leave men with as they’re thinking about work-life balance, optimizing their lives? What other seeds of wisdom do you have, Taylor?

 

Taylor Morgan:

I’m going to steal this one from my client. I interview many of my clients after they go through the program, and I ask them what their advice would be for somebody? And I really liked his, and it’s just, “Ask for help.”

 

Shana James:

I love that.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Because men especially are so conditioned not to. And just figure it out for themselves.

 

Shana James:

Yeah. “I’ve got to do it on my own. I’ve got to be the rock. I’ve got to be the strong one.”

 

Taylor Morgan:

Yes. But once you ask for help in your life, whether that’s by hiring a business coach or getting a personal trainer, or going to therapy, once you ask for help, once you can make that step, things just start to get better. So ask for help.

 

Shana James:

I agree. Well, thank you so much for sharing your worldview. You’ve experienced a lot, and I can feel your humility as well as your drive. Your commitment, your dedication to health and growth and well-being for yourself and to other people. Thank you so much for being a man on this planet supporting others to do good and be happy.

 

Taylor Morgan:

Thank you for having me. This was amazing.

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